kiqi

A while back the first Kiwiana Goes Pop album was released featuring my song Good Keen Metrosexual. Kiwiana Goes Pop 2 is out now and features Billy T James, John Clarke and Tim Finn’s little known song ‘Runs in the Family.’ The old TV ads on the album are a good laugh. Fiona McDonald (Columbine pantyhose), Annie Crummer (Soda Stream) and Hugo Said You Go (KFC). Not to forget The Miramar Chess Club with this brilliant Rugby World Cup song. I snuck onto the album with my song ‘Great Place To Bring Up the Kids, a satirical (sometimes acerbic) look at life from my book Myth New Zealand. Random, weird, nostalgic collection. Enjoy!

PS. Brilliant artwork by Lester Hall

If you’re thinking of traveling to New Zealand one day, it could be a wise move to watch this video first. I filmed it on the streets of Auckland. Despite sounding like an episode of ‘Flight of the Conchords,’ these sayings are used daily.

Choice, bro! She’ll be right! Sweet as!

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When I turned 36½ I discovered I was the age of the ‘average’ New Zealander. But who, I wondered, is the average New Zealander?

Long story short, I decided it was time to face some of our national sacred cows.

Did the ‘good keen bloke’ still exist?

Whatever happened to 80 Million Sheep?

Is this the greatest place in the world to bring up kids?

The result was ‘Myth New Zealand’ – now available to read on Kindle. The first four chapters are free (via KDP select) here and the full book is here. I’ve been told it’s essential reading for Kiwis – and anyone planning to go to New Zealand – but you’ll have to see for yourself.

Some kind things people said about Myth New Zealand:

‘A guidebook that explains what makes Kiwis tick’ – Jackie Russell, The Times

‘An insightful meander through our history with a look into our future’ – M2 magazine

‘I borrowed it off a friend and I’m not giving it back’ – entertainer and author Max Cryer

‘Justin Brown is the natural heir to Max Cryer, except he’s shorter and can’t play the piano’. – national broadcaster Jim Mora

‘A humorous and provocative look at New Zealand and the way we see ourselves today’ – book critic Graham Beattie

‘Comical, thought provoking look at our country’ – Nicky Pellegrino, Herald On Sunday